8 Myths About Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOD) – They’re Dangerous!

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Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOD)

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that can affect women and girls of childbearing age. The symptoms include irregular or absent periods, infertility, abnormal hair growth, acne, and excess weight gain. It can be difficult to diagnose as it shares many similar symptoms with other conditions like PCOD, endometriosis, and thyroid disorders. This blog post will dispel five myths about polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOD).

Myths About PCODs You Need To Steer Clear From:

1) PCOS is not a real condition

For many years the medical community was skeptical about PCOS and argued that there is no evidence for its existence. The American Society of Reproductive Medicine’s (ASRM) position has since been updated to state that “while some earlier reports had questioned whether polycystic ovaries are an identifiable clinical entity, more recent evidence suggests that they are.”

PCOS is a condition that affects women and girls of childbearing age. The symptoms include irregular or absent periods, infertility, abnormal hair growth, acne, and excess weight gain. It can be difficult to diagnose as it shares many similar symptoms with other conditions like PCOD, endometriosis, and thyroid disorders.

2) Losing weight will get you rid of PCOD

PCOS can’t be cured, and there is no cure for PCOS. Dieting may help to manage the symptoms or make them less severe, but it won’t get rid of PCOD. Losing weight will not prevent, reduce nor lower your chances of getting polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Polycystic ovaries are present in up to 70% of overweight women and 40% of obese ones.

The symptoms of PCOS include irregular or absent periods, infertility, abnormal hair growth, acne, and excess weight gain. It can be difficult to diagnose as it shares many similar symptoms with other conditions like endometriosis and thyroid disorders.

3) You can’t get pregnant with PCOD

It’s possible to get pregnant with PCOD. It is important for you to discuss all of your fertility options and treatment possibilities with a healthcare provider before making any decisions about pregnancy or childbirth. You can consult your healthcare provider for advice on how to get pregnant with PCOD.

4) PCOD is caused by the pill

The contraceptive pill does not cause PCOS. Taking it around ovulation may increase your risk of developing other hormonal problems like PCOS, but this isn’t down to the pill itself as such. It’s more likely that these are side effects of taking hormones in high doses.

PCOS can be prevented or controlled by hormonal contraception. The most popular birth control methods for women with PCOS are oral contraceptives and the contraceptive implant, which both contain hormones that can help to regulate your periods or prevent ovulation altogether. The intrauterine device (IUD) is also a good option as it doesn’t use any hormones.

5) PCOS means you’re infertile

PCOS is not a cause of infertility. It can be diagnosed at any point, and women with PCOS are still able to get pregnant. It may just take them longer or require more help.

Some people believe that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOD) makes one infertile, but this is not a correct statement. PCOD has nothing to do with your fertility.

6) PCOD is a rare condition

PCOD is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age, affecting around 12% worldwide. It’s not a disease that only affects “a few” people – this condition can affect anyone with ovaries, and their hormones go haywire!

7) PCOD is diagnosed with ultrasound

It’s not possible to diagnose PCOD with ultrasound. Ultrasound cannot measure hormone levels, which can be a key indicator of the condition.

PCOD is diagnosed by measuring your blood sugar and testing for insulin resistance (IR). IR is often measured using an oral glucose tolerance test or OGTT. A fasting blood sample will also be taken. IR is a complex condition that is intertwined with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

It’s difficult to diagnose PCOD without measuring IR because there are other conditions that can cause high testosterone levels or irregular periods in women, such as polycystic ovaries (a benign condition), ovarian cancer, congenital adrenal hyperplasia or other adrenal diseases, and some medications.

8) Life becomes extremely difficult with PCOD

There are three different types of PCOS. Women with Type I or hyperandrogenic PCOS often have hair loss and acne. They also tend to be obese because they can’t metabolize sugar properly in the body due to IR, which is a precursor for type II diabetes.

Women with Type II or anovulatory PCOS will experience fewer symptoms such as irregular periods, hair loss, and acne. They are likely to be normal weight because they can produce some hormones of their own, which regulates the menstrual cycle.

Conclusion

PCOD is a condition that affects many women, but myths about it are persistent. It can be successfully managed with proper treatment and lifestyle changes. There’s still much to learn about PCOD, so stay tuned for more information in the future!

Read More: Ovarian Cancer – Most Common Cancer in Women

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